9. Heartbreak

 

Heartbreak—had I been born anything but human, perhaps I would not have felt it. But we don’t get to choose what we’re born, any more than we get to choose who loves us. And when those we wish would love us don’t—love hurts. Yet, it is not love itself which hurts, but the lack thereof.

We know we ought to love our neighbor as ourselves; I am led to believe that this is of greater importance than love for God. Because to love Him whom you have not seen, while you passively neglect those whom you have, is an unprofitable contradiction (1 John 4:20). Your love of religion, your faith, your hope, all collapse before you when you show indifference. All your eloquence and scriptures become dead noise, profiting you nothing. How can your God be with you when you are not where He is? I have seen Him with the lonely and rejected. With those who eat by themselves. With those who are forced to walk alone. With those whom you did not associate with.

Our brains respond to heartbreak, the way it responds to physiological pain (Kraft, 2011). Too many cry alone for us as followers of God to do nothing about. We are fundamentally dependent upon one another for our cognitive, emotional, and physiological development (Harlow, 1958). Our words and actions, our neglect or compassions, all mutually influence the well-being of others, which in turn influence our own.

As Christians we should enjoy taking the love of God to those who are destitute of it, knowing that in so doing we bring them life. We are social beings, and loneliness can affect everything from heart disease to blood pressure, to how long you live (Resnick, 2017). I propose that the loving embrace of a friend, is nothing short of life itself. And the sweet embrace of God’s love, nothing short of life eternal.

We are a broken people, and they will know us by our love. (John 13:35).

~John Bryan

Book Recommendation: I Kissed Dating Goodbye by Joshua Harris

Reference: (Harlow, 1958) (Kraft, 2011) (Resnick, 2017)
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5 Comments on “9. Heartbreak

  1. John I don’t know if you will understand but this is the reality of my life and world. There is god and i have faith in my god.

    I am a broken person and so are my people. The cuase of our pain started with the arrival of the Bible. With all sorts of kings of evil done to my people still they still have love. Not the kingd of love you will understand.

    Humans are natural just as grass, air and water are. We are all connected. The divede in this world becuase of relegions (different yet all the same and the fact that they are more political than being of faith). Muslims and christians are at war. Power is what churches or religion is all about.

    It is a sin in my culture not to forgive even if a person has not asked for forgiveness. But i have head people preach love yet they go do things that make me scared of christians or any other religion. The world is falling apart its becuase other people wants to be gods.

    I am Zulu young man thought to love his brother and die wherever he dies. Accept and respect any form of life I doubt this book could change what I see out there. But trying is good thing.

    As I am writing this I am very much emotional.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I am led to believe that this is of greater importance than love for God. Because to love Him whom you have not seen, while you passively neglect those whom you have, is an unprofitable contradiction (1 John 4:20).

    I understand and agree with what you’re getting at, but I worry you are verging on a false dichotomy. The point of that passage in 1 John (and a great many others, such as Christ’s discussion of the Last Judgment) is that you do not in fact love God if you do not love your neighbor.

    In addition, we mustn’t neglect charity towards those who balance many, many responsibilities, and whose God-given gifts do not lead in the same direction. It is one thing to hand out enormous quantities of food to the poor in order to keep them out of your neighborhood, and to send your children to a private school in order to keep them away from “those people.” It is another thing entirely to buy a meal for a homeless person when you can, and to walk by when you cannot, or to send your children to a private school in order to raise them in a Christian culture.

    (I say this only because I was once in a position where I was quick to judge those who were religious, mainly because I was ignorant of how much they did that went unseen. It kept me away from Church for a long, long time, and thereby kept me from doing a lot of good. The Father of Lies has many ways to deceive.)

    Liked by 1 person

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